‘Why may not man one day be immortal?’: Population, perfectibility, and the immortality question in Godwin's Political Justice

@article{Chonaill2007WhyMN,
  title={‘Why may not man one day be immortal?’: Population, perfectibility, and the immortality question in Godwin's Political Justice},
  author={S{\'i}obh{\'a}n Ni Chonaill},
  journal={History of European Ideas},
  year={2007},
  volume={33},
  pages={25 - 39}
}

Radical Enlightenment and Antimodernism: The Apostasy of William Godwin (1756–1836)

I n 1799, with conservative reaction to the principles and activity of the French Revolution at its height, the English radical intellectual William Godwin published the historical novel St. Leon: A

"The Tyranny of Age": Godwin's St. Leon and the Nineteenth-Century Longevity Narrative

This essay reads William Godwin's novel St. Leon (1799) in relation to contemporaneous medicalizing discourses concerned with the elimination of old age. I argue that in St. Leon, a speculative case

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In 1809 the radical English philosopher, novelist, and historian William Godwin published Essay on Sepulchres—a proposal to mark the burial sites of the morally great with a simple wooden cross. This

"O Happy Earth! reality of Heaven!": Melancholy and Utopia in Romantic Climatology

This essay responds to Jonathan Bate's call for a "Global Warming Criticism" by reconsidering strains of Romantic utopianism in relation to current perspectives on a changing climate. The relation

Scepticism and experience in the educational writing of William Godwin

This thesis focuses on the educational thought of William Godwin (1756-1836) and how it is expressed through his essays and fiction. Attention here focuses on the Account of the Seminary (1783), The

Every Child Left Behind: St. Leon and William Godwin's Immortal Future

Dwelling with the speculation of a childless future described in the appendix to Political Justice, this article explores Godwin's departure from a vision of futurity tied to the figure of the child.

Blasphemous bodies: Transgressive mortality as cultural interrogation in romance fiction of the long nineteenth century

The long nineteenth century was characterized by advances in medical, biological and technological knowledge that often complicated definitions of human life and blurred the lines between life and

To Life: Golems, Monsters and the Biotechnology Future

While some would like to present Jewish legends of the golem as a pro-biotechnology answer to the cautionary tale of Frankenstein’s monster, examination of Shelley’s Frankenstein and Rosenberg’s The

Just friends? Frankenstein and the friend to come

Readers are used to construing Robert Walton’s narrative, relayed in letters to sister Margaret Saville, as framing the life stories of Victor Frankenstein and the unnamed Creature and thereby prep...

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1796) II, 515. This argument is repeated in the third edition in the appendix 'Of Health and the Prolongation of Human Life

  • 1796) II, 515. This argument is repeated in the third edition in the appendix 'Of Health and the Prolongation of Human Life