‘THE SIMPLE JEW’: THE ‘PRICE TAG’ PHENOMENON, VIGILANTISM, AND RABBI YITZCHAK GINSBURGH’S POLITICAL KABBALAH

@article{Satherley2014THESJ,
  title={‘THE SIMPLE JEW’: THE ‘PRICE TAG’ PHENOMENON, VIGILANTISM, AND RABBI YITZCHAK GINSBURGH’S POLITICAL KABBALAH},
  author={Tessa Satherley},
  journal={Melilah: Manchester Journal of Jewish Studies (1759-1953)},
  year={2014},
  volume={10},
  pages={57 - 91}
}
  • T. Satherley
  • Published 1 January 2014
  • History
  • Melilah: Manchester Journal of Jewish Studies (1759-1953)
This paper explores the Kabbalistic theosophy of Rabbi Yitzchak Ginsburgh, and allegations of links between his yeshiva and violent political activism and vigilantism. Ginsburgh is head of the yeshiva Od Yosef Chai (Joseph Still Lives) in Samaria/the northern West Bank. His students and colleagues have been accused by the authorities of violence and vandalism against Arabs in the context of ‘price tag’ actions and vigilante attacks, while publications by Ginsburgh and his yeshiva colleagues… 
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