‘Respectable Exotics’: Exhibiting South Asian Modernists in Britain, 1958 and 2017

@article{Correia2020RespectableEE,
  title={‘Respectable Exotics’: Exhibiting South Asian Modernists in Britain, 1958 and 2017},
  author={Alice Correia},
  journal={Visual Culture in Britain},
  year={2020},
  volume={21},
  pages={310 - 329}
}
  • A. Correia
  • Published 1 September 2020
  • Art
  • Visual Culture in Britain
In 1958, Gallery One, London, staged an exhibition titled, ‘Seven Indian Painters in Europe’ featuring work by some of the most prestigious contemporary artists of South Asian origin. In 2017, the Whitworth Art Gallery revisited this earlier exhibition, staging ‘South Asian Modernists 1953–1963ʹ. Visiting this recent show prompted a reconsideration of the 1958 exhibition, its content and reception, and a reflection upon the ways in which South Asian artists exhibiting in London during the 1950s… 

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