‘Pheromones’: a New Term for a Class of Biologically Active Substances

@article{Karlson1959PheromonesAN,
  title={‘Pheromones’: a New Term for a Class of Biologically Active Substances},
  author={Peter Karlson and Martin L{\"u}scher},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1959},
  volume={183},
  pages={55-56}
}
DURING the past few decades, investigations have been made into various active substances which, though they resemble hormones in some respects, cannot be included among them. For example, the sexual attractants of butterflies are, like hormones, produced and secreted by special glands; minute amounts cause a specific reaction in the receptor organ (the antenna of the male), which eventually leads to a state of copulative readiness. Unlike hormones, however, the substance is not secreted into… 
Terminology of Some Biologically Active Substances and Validity of the Term ‘Pheromones’
TLDR
All biologically active substances secreted by animals into their environment and influencing other organisms are designated, including hormones, para-hormones and other substances which display their physiological action within the organism producing them.
Review Article Pheromones in Animal World: Types, Detection and its Application
TLDR
Pheromones is a chemical substance secreted externally by certain animals, such as insects, affecting the behaviour or physiology of other animals of the same species often functioning as an attractant of the opposite sex.
Recent results in insect pheromone chemistry.
Pheromones are substances which are secreted to the outside by an animal, especially an insect, and received by a second individual of the same species, in which they release a specific reaction, for
Insect chemical communication: Pheromones and exocrine glands of ants
TLDR
This work has described several different types of pheromones of ants, particularly those involved in recruitment, recognition, territorial and alarm behaviours, and identified a wide range of substances from these glands.
Pheromones and their role as aphrodisiacs: A review
TLDR
The role of human pheromones as aphrodisiacs is highlighted to highlight the importance of olfactory communication in mammalian reproduction.
In search of human skin pheromones.
  • B. A. Cohn
  • Biology, Medicine
    Archives of dermatology
  • 1994
TLDR
Pheromones may be present in many different sites in animals, such as in the skin, including some of its glands, saliva, urine, vaginal discharge, and feces, but these chemicals may also be received by contact.
Allohormones: a class of bioactive substances favoured by sexual selection
TLDR
Although the importance of allohormones in reproductive processes is emphasised, they may also have important functions outside of copulation.
Pheromones among the procaryotes.
  • K. Stephens
  • Biology, Medicine
    Critical reviews in microbiology
  • 1986
TLDR
Pheromones excreted by myxobacteria, actinomycetes, and cyanobacteria elicit specific developmental responses from these organisms and regulate bioluminescence of these organisms.
From pheromones to behavior.
TLDR
The current knowledge on the behavioral, physiological, and molecular aspects of pheromone detection in mammals is discussed in this review.
Sexual communication via peptide and protein pheromones.
  • K. Touhara
  • Biology, Medicine
    Current opinion in pharmacology
  • 2008
TLDR
In this review, current knowledge on the structure and function of peptide and protein pheromones in vertebrates as well as the mechanisms underlying receptor-mediated signal processing will be summarized.
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References

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