‘Pain relief’ learning in fruit flies

@article{Yarali2008PainRL,
  title={‘Pain relief’ learning in fruit flies},
  author={A. Yarali and T. Niewalda and Yi-Chun Chen and H. Tanimoto and S. Duerrnagel and B. Gerber},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2008},
  volume={76},
  pages={1173-1185}
}
We studied the behavioural consequences of ‘traumatic’, painful experiences. These consequences were fundamentally asymmetric. Fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, learned two kinds of prediction regarding a ‘traumatic’ experience. If an odour preceded an electric shock during training, it predicted shock, and flies subsequently avoided it. When the sequence of events during training was reversed, that is odour followed shock, the odour predicted relief from shock and flies approached it. We… Expand
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