‘O father: where art thou?’— Paternity assessment in an open fission–fusion society of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay, Western Australia

@article{Krtzen2004OFW,
  title={‘O father: where art thou?’— Paternity assessment in an open fission–fusion society of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay, Western Australia},
  author={Michael Kr{\"u}tzen and Lynne M. Barre and Richard C. Connor and Janet Mann and William Bruce Sherwin},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={13}
}
Sexually mature male bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay cooperate by pursuing distinct alliance strategies to monopolize females in reproductive condition. We present the results of a comprehensive study in a wild cetacean population to test whether male alliance membership is a prerequisite for reproductive success. We compared two methods for inferring paternity: both calculate a likelihood ratio, called the paternity index, between two opposing hypotheses, but they differ in the way that… 
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