‘Handedness’ in snakes? Lateralization of coiling behaviour in a cottonmouth, Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma, population

@article{Roth2003HandednessIS,
  title={‘Handedness’ in snakes? Lateralization of coiling behaviour in a cottonmouth, Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma, population},
  author={Eric D. Roth},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2003},
  volume={66},
  pages={337-341}
}
  • E. D. Roth
  • Published 1 August 2003
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Animal Behaviour
Studies have documented the presence of behavioural lateralization in many groups of lower vertebrates, demonstrating that these behaviours are not limited to mammals and birds. These studies suggest that the evolution of brain lateralization, often linked to lateralized behaviours, may have occurred early in evolutionary history and may not have been the result of multiple independent evolutionary events as previously thought. The goal of this study was to further document behavioural… 

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