‘Getting your wheel in the door’: successful full-time employment experiences of individuals with cerebral palsy who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication

@article{Mcnaughton2002GettingYW,
  title={‘Getting your wheel in the door’: successful full-time employment experiences of individuals with cerebral palsy who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication},
  author={David Mcnaughton and Janice Light and K. Bregt Arnold},
  journal={Augmentative and Alternative Communication},
  year={2002},
  volume={18},
  pages={59 - 76}
}
Eight individuals with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and were employed full time participated in a focus group discussion that was conducted on the Internet. Six major themes emerged from the discussion: (a) descriptions of employment activities, (b) benefits of employment and reasons for being employed, (c) negative impacts resulting from employment, (d) barriers to employment, (e) supports required for employment, and (f) recommendations for improving… Expand
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