‘Getting back to real living’: a qualitative study of the process of community reintegration after stroke

@article{Wood2010GettingBT,
  title={‘Getting back to real living’: a qualitative study of the process of community reintegration after stroke},
  author={Jennifer P. Wood and Denise M. Connelly and Monica R. Maly},
  journal={Clinical Rehabilitation},
  year={2010},
  volume={24},
  pages={1045 - 1056}
}
Objectives: To examine the process of community reintegration over the first year following stroke, from the patient’s perspective. Design: Qualitative, longitudinal, grounded theory study involving ten participants. During the first year post discharge from inpatient rehabilitation, 46 one-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten participants. Interviews were completed with participants before discharge from inpatient stroke rehabilitation and in their homes at two weeks… 

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