‘False feeding’ and aggression in meerkat societies

@article{CluttonBrock2005FalseFA,
  title={‘False feeding’ and aggression in meerkat societies},
  author={Tim H. Clutton‐Brock and Andrew F Russell and Lynda L. Sharpe and Neil R. Jordan},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2005},
  volume={69},
  pages={1273-1284}
}
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Results indicate that a trade-off between chicks' needs (current reproduction) and caregivers' conditions (future reproduction) modulates the occurrence of false feeding, determining different responses in different group members.
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A critical analysis of ‘false-feeding’ behavior in a cooperatively breeding bird: disturbance effects, satiated nestlings or deception?
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Helpers increase the reproductive potential of offspring in cooperative meerkats
TLDR
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Cooperative breeding systems
TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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