‘Elementary Principles of Education’: Elizabeth Hamilton, Maria Edgeworth and the Uses of Common Sense Philosophy

@article{Rendall2013ElementaryPO,
  title={‘Elementary Principles of Education’: Elizabeth Hamilton, Maria Edgeworth and the Uses of Common Sense Philosophy},
  author={J. Rendall},
  journal={History of European Ideas},
  year={2013},
  volume={39},
  pages={613 - 630}
}
  • J. Rendall
  • Published 2013
  • Sociology
  • History of European Ideas
Summary Both Maria Edgeworth and Elizabeth Hamilton drew extensively on Scottish moral philosophy, and especially on the work of Dugald Stewart, in constructing educational programmes that rested on the assumption that women, and especially mothers, were intellectually capable of understanding the importance of the early association of ideas in the training of children's emotions and reasoning powers. As liberals they found in Stewart's work routes toward intellectual and social progress—both… Expand
2 Citations

References

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Elizabeth Hamilton's Letters on Education: Common Sense Alternatives to Scepticism and their Aesthetic Consequences
  • 88Á111; Marilyn Butler, 'Irish Culture and Scottish Enlightenment: Maria Edgeworth and Histories of the Future', in Economy, Polity and Society: British Intellectual History, 1750Á1950
  • 2000
Writing and Revolution
  • 42
236, accused her of even exhibiting the propensity to magnify the idea of self
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510Á49; all attributions of authorship for the Quarterly Review follow Hill Shine and Helen Chadwick Shine. The Quarterly Review under Gifford: Identification of Contributors 1809Á1824
  • Memoirs of R. L. Edgeworth, Esq', Quarterly Review
Adaptations
    Democratizing Taste
      II, 341Á45; critics included Critical Review
      • Letters on Education (1803)
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