‘Conservation is now a Dead Word’: Marjory Stoneman Douglas and the Transformation of American Environmentalism

@article{Davis2003ConservationIN,
  title={‘Conservation is now a Dead Word’: Marjory Stoneman Douglas and the Transformation of American Environmentalism},
  author={Jack Emory Davis},
  journal={Environmental History},
  year={2003},
  volume={8},
  pages={53 - 76}
}
  • J. Davis
  • Published 1 January 2003
  • Sociology
  • Environmental History

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