‘Arsenic-life’ bacterium prefers phosphorus after all

@article{Cressey2012ArseniclifeBP,
  title={‘Arsenic-life’ bacterium prefers phosphorus after all},
  author={Daniel Cressey},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2012}
}
Transport proteins show 4,000-fold preference for phosphate over arsenate. 
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References

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Comment on “A Bacterium That Can Grow by Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus”
TLDR
Although their data show that GFAJ-1 is an extraordinary extremophile, consideration of arsenate redox chemistry undermines the suggestion that arsenate can replace the physiologic functions of phosphate.
A Bacterium That Can Grow by Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus
TLDR
A bacterium is described, isolated from Mono Lake, California, that is able to substitute arsenic for phosphorus to sustain its growth and exchange of one of the major bio-elements may have profound evolutionary and geochemical importance.
GFAJ-1 Is an Arsenate-Resistant, Phosphate-Dependent Organism
TLDR
It is shown that GFAJ-1 is able to grow at low phosphate concentrations, even in the presence of high concentrations of arsenate, but lacks the ability to grow in phosphorus-depleted medium, while efficiently scavenging phosphate.