‘Anyone can edit’, not everyone does: Wikipedia’s infrastructure and the gender gap

@article{Ford2017AnyoneCE,
  title={‘Anyone can edit’, not everyone does: Wikipedia’s infrastructure and the gender gap},
  author={H. Ford and J. Wajcman},
  journal={Social Studies of Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={47},
  pages={511 - 527}
}
Feminist STS has long established that science’s provenance as a male domain continues to define what counts as knowledge and expertise. Wikipedia, arguably one of the most powerful sources of information today, was initially lauded as providing the opportunity to rebuild knowledge institutions by providing greater representation of multiple groups. However, less than ten percent of Wikipedia editors are women. At one level, this imbalance in contributions and therefore content is yet another… Expand

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