Corpus ID: 12504003

α−Lipoic Acid: Biological Effects and Clinical Implications

@inproceedings{Nichols1997LipoicAB,
  title={$\alpha$−Lipoic Acid: Biological Effects and Clinical Implications},
  author={T. Nichols},
  year={1997}
}
α− Lipoic acid is unique in its ability to act as an antioxidant in fat- and watersoluble tissues in both its oxidized and reduced forms. It is readily absorbed from an oral dose. Because of its myriad biological activities, including an ability to chelate metals and to scavenge a wide array of free radicals, α− lipoic acid is considered by several experts to be an ideal antioxidant. Clinical applications for this nutrient include the following conditions: diabetic polyneuropathy, cataracts… Expand

Figures from this paper

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TLDR
Alpha-lipoic acid administration has been shown to be effective in preventing pathology in various experimental models in which reactive oxygen species have been implicated. Expand
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It is suggested that oxidative stress is possibly involved in the IFO-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and the potential therapeutic role for ALA and NAC against IFO -induced neophrotoxicity is suggested. Expand
Differential Activity of Lipoic Acid Enantiomers in Cell Culture
TLDR
It is unclear whether the two enantiomeric forms of lipoic acid (LA) share similar pharmacological activity and the exact cellular targets of LA are not well identified, but when C6 glioma was damaged by hydrogen peroxide, all forms of LA protected and mitochondrial metabolism was the primary endpoint. Expand
Dietary α-lipoic acid prevents UVB-induced corneal and conjunctival degeneration through multiple effects.
TLDR
Dietary α-LA can prevent UVB-induced corneal damage and can be used as a prophylactic agent prior to excessive UVB exposure. Expand
Antigenotoxic effect of lipoic acid against mitomycin-C in human lymphocyte cultures
TLDR
Results demonstrated anticlastogenic and antimutagenic effects of LA against MMC induced genotoxicity and are encouraging that LA can be a possible chemopreventive agent in tumorigenesis in both cancer patients and in health care persons handling anti-cancer drugs. Expand
Physiological and Histopathological Investigations on the Effects of α-Lipoic Acid in Rats Exposed to Malathion
  • A. M. Al-Attar
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of biomedicine & biotechnology
  • 2010
TLDR
It is demonstrated that pretreatment with α-lipoic acid significantly attenuated the physiological and histopathological alterations induced by malathion. Expand
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TLDR
Values for pharmacokinetic parameters of orally administered DL-α-lipoic acid may differ significantly when there are changes in dosage, method of administration, and fed status. Expand
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TLDR
It is shown that the tonoplast-localized and the putative tumor suppressor Cyt-b561 proteins can be reduced by other reductants than ASC and dithionite. Expand

References

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TLDR
The properties of lipoate are reviewed in terms of reactions with reactive oxygen species; interactions with other antioxidants; beneficial effects in oxidative stress models or clinical conditions. Expand
Thioctic (lipoic) acid: a therapeutic metal-chelating antioxidant?
TLDR
It is found that prior intracellular reduction of TA to dihydrolipoic acid is not an obligatory mechanism for an antioxidant effect of the drug, which may also operate via Cu(2+)-chelation. Expand
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It is concluded that LA and DHLA have powerful antioxidant properties but can also exert pro-oxidant properties, both by its iron ion-reducing ability and probably by its ability to generate reactive sulphur-containing radicals that can damage certain proteins, such as alpha 1-antiproteinase and creatine kinase. Expand
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The efficacy of α-lipoic acid in alleviating symptoms of ascorbic acid and of tocopherol deficiencies can best be explained on the basis of a protective action exerted by α- lipidic acid or its dihydro derivative on the two vitamins. Expand
Neuroprotective effects of α-lipoic acid and its enantiomers demonstrated in rodent models of focal cerebral ischemia
TLDR
In mice and rats, both enantiomers revealed a similar neuroprotective potency when they were administered subcutaneously 1 or 2 hr before occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), whereas a longer time period of pretreatment failed to exert neuroprotection. Expand
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TLDR
Data show that there was no effect of alpha-lipoic acid supplementation on vitamin E tissue concentrations, arguing against a role for alpha- Lipoic Acid in regenerating vitamin E in vivo. Expand
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Abstract From a study of acute heavy-metal toxicity it has been found that dl -α-lipoic acid (a) is effective for the prevention and reversal of arsenic intoxication in mice and dogs; (b) effectivelyExpand
Studies on the efficacy of lipoate and dihydrolipoate in the alteration of cadmium2+ toxicity in isolated hepatocytes.
TLDR
It is suggested that dihydrolipoate primarily protects cells by extracellular chelation of Cd2+, whereas intracellular reduction of lipoate to the dihydro-compound followed by complexation of both intra- and extraceocytes contributes to the amelioration provided bylipoate. Expand
Neuroprotective effects of alpha-lipoic acid and its enantiomers demonstrated in rodent models of focal cerebral ischemia.
TLDR
In mice and rats, both enantiomers revealed a similar neuroprotective potency when they were administered subcutaneously 1 or 2 hr before occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), whereas a longer time period of pretreatment failed to exert neuroprotection. Expand
Alpha-lipoic acid prevents buthionine sulfoximine-induced cataract formation in newborn rats.
TLDR
It is concluded that alpha-lipoic acid may take over some of the functions of glutathione (e.g., maintaining the higher level of ascorbate, indirect participation in vitamin E recycling); the increase of glutATHione level in lens tissue mediated by lipoate could be also due to a direct protection of protein thiols. Expand
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