`You're Fired': An Application of Speech Act Theory to 2 Samuel 15.23—16.14

@article{Mann2009YoureFA,
  title={`You're Fired': An Application of Speech Act Theory to 2 Samuel 15.23—16.14},
  author={Steve Mann},
  journal={Journal for the Study of the Old Testament},
  year={2009},
  volume={33},
  pages={315 - 334}
}
  • S. Mann
  • Published 1 March 2009
  • Sociology
  • Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
While the role of speech act theory in studying how words do things in real life continues to yield insight into the study of language, the theory can also contribute to an understanding of the performative nature of words in regard to biblical narrative. In this article speech act theory is applied to the narrative of 2 Sam. 15.23—16.14 in two ways. First, the speech acts of the characters are analyzed as real speech acts using the categories presented by John Searle to see how they function… 
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