`The King's Army into the Partes of Bretaigne': Henry VII and the Breton Wars,

@article{Currin2000TheKA,
  title={`The King's Army into the Partes of Bretaigne': Henry VII and the Breton Wars,},
  author={John M. Currin},
  journal={War in History},
  year={2000},
  volume={7},
  pages={379 - 412}
}
  • John M. Currin
  • Published 1 October 2000
  • History, Economics
  • War in History
Between 1489-91 Henry VII projected his military power abroad in an attempt to prevent the French conquest of Brittany and influence political affairs in the duchy. This episode in Tudor military and diplomatic history, however, has been largely ignored by historians. This article discusses the English military and political involvement in Brittany, the composition of land and naval forces, the strategies employed, and the mistakes and circumstances that contributed to the Anglo-Breton defeat… 
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