• Corpus ID: 34103599

\Opt-Out" Rates at Motherhood Across High-Education Career Paths: Selection Versus Work Environment ⁄

@inproceedings{Herr2010OptOutRA,
  title={\Opt-Out" Rates at Motherhood Across High-Education Career Paths: Selection Versus Work Environment ⁄},
  author={Jane Leber Herr and Catherine Wolfram},
  year={2010}
}
This paper assesses whether work environment has a causal efiect on mothers’ labor force participation. Using data from the 2003 National Survey of College Graduates and a sample of Harvard alumnae, we flnd large variation in mothers’ labor force attachment across high-education flelds. We use the rich information available in each dataset, and the longitudinal nature of the Harvard data, to try to disentangle whether these patterns re∞ect selection across graduate degrees, or variation in the… 

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