"We've decided to wake a mish for you": Gift Exchange and Didacticism in Tove Jansson's Finn Family Moomintroll

@article{Snchez2002WeveDT,
  title={"We've decided to wake a mish for you": Gift Exchange and Didacticism in Tove Jansson's Finn Family Moomintroll},
  author={Reuben M{\'a}rquez S{\'a}nchez},
  journal={The Lion and the Unicorn},
  year={2002},
  volume={26},
  pages={50 - 65}
}
  • R. Sánchez
  • Published 1 January 2002
  • Education
  • The Lion and the Unicorn
An earnest young reporter asked me: “What are you trying to do when you write for children?” “I’m trying to write as well as I possibly can,” I answered. He thought I hadn’t understood his question. “No, no,” he said. “What I mean is, what is your philosophy of writing for children? Isn’t there some moral you want to get across to them? Aren’t there some values you wish to instill in your young readers?” “I’m trying,” I said, “to write for my readers the best story, the truest story of which I… 

References

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Tove Jansson and Her Readers: No One Excluded
Tove Jansson has not written a Moomintroll novel since 1970, when Moominvalley in November left the Moomins somewhere at sea, with only the youngest member of their extended household, Toft, await-
Children's Literature: Criticism and the Fictional Child
'Children's Literature: Criticism and the Fictional Child' draws on literary and critical theory to argue that children's literature criticism through its often contradictory versions of the `child'
Finn Family Moomintroll
Poor little chap! He had been turned into a very strange animal indeed ...Although they're small, fat and shy creatures; Moomins have the most amazing adventures. It all begins when Moominpappa tries