"Unhidden" Transcripts

@article{Goings1995UnhiddenT,
  title={"Unhidden" Transcripts},
  author={Kenneth W. Goings and Gerald L. K. Smith},
  journal={Journal of Urban History},
  year={1995},
  volume={21},
  pages={372 - 394}
}

“I THOUGHT I FOUND HOME”: LOCATING THE HIDDEN AND SYMBOLIC SPACES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LESBIAN BELONGING

OF DISSERTATION “I THOUGHT I FOUND HOME”: LOCATING THE HIDDEN AND SYMBOLIC SPACES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LESBIAN BELONGING This dissertation investigates the place-making practices of African American

Beyond the Rope: The Impact of Lynching on Black Culture and Memory

Beyond the Rope is an interdisciplinary study that draws on narrative theory and cultural studies methodologies to trace African Americans' changing attitudes and relationships to lynching over the

Institutionalizing Counter‐Memories of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement: The National Civil Rights Museum and an Application of the Interest‐Convergence Principle

During the post–Reconstruction era in the United States, white southerners marked the cultural landscape with monuments and memorials honoring the Confederate cause and its heroes. These racialized

The Impresarios of Beale Street: African American and Italian American Theatre Managers in Memphis, 1900–1915

Music scholars Lynn Abbott and Doug Seroff have researched what they call “a deep African American vaudeville theater tradition” in Memphis during the first decade of the twentieth century that

Re-Placing Southern Geographies: The Role of Latino Migration in Transforming the South, Its Identities, and Its Study

This manuscript argues that southern geographies are being re-placed materially, discursively, and institutionally through Latino migration. Drawing on ethnographic research in Nashville and

Resisting Lynching: Black Grassroots Responses to Lynching in the Mississippi and Arkansas Deltas, 1882--1938

Resisting Lynching: Black Grassroots Responses to Lynching in the Mississippi and Arkansas Deltas, 1882–1938” explores the social and cultural history of the black experience of lynching. It

African Americans Versus the Memphis Street Railway Company

The traditional interpretation of the southern justice system is that African Americans rarely, if ever, won. This article examines a seemingly anomalous situation in Memphis in which at the turn of

Building Businesses, Creating Communities: Residential Segregation and the Growth of African American Business in Southern Cities, 1880–1915

Patterns of residential segregation in late-nineteenth-century southern cities had great influence on the type of African American business that developed. They also affected the relative stability

North American Urban History: The Everyday Politics and Spatial Logics of Metropolitan Life

At the start of the twenty-first century, North American urban history is flourishing. Compared to twenty-five years ago, the field has become more interdisciplinary and intellectually invigorating.