"The lytel erthe that here is": Environmental Thought in Chaucer's Parliament of Fowls

@article{Crane2017TheLE,
  title={"The lytel erthe that here is": Environmental Thought in Chaucer's Parliament of Fowls},
  author={Susan C. M. Crane},
  journal={Studies in the Age of Chaucer},
  year={2017},
  volume={39},
  pages={1 - 30}
}
Chaucer’s Parliament of Fowls traces his rejection of Neoplatonist and moral allegories, with their emphasis on transcendent truths and teachings. Instead, the Parliament’s dreamer observes and absorbs a richly sensual earthly environment, replacing mainstream allegory’s guiding question “How shall I save myself?” with the more mundane question “What’s happening here?” In exploring this latter question, the Parliament stages three contrasting ontologies—three models of how living things are… CONTINUE READING

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References

Publications referenced by this paper.

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