"The Fairest Lady": Gender and Race in William Byrd's "Account of a Negro-Boy that is dappel'd in several Places of his Body with White Spots" (1697)

@article{Malcolmson2018TheFL,
  title={"The Fairest Lady": Gender and Race in William Byrd's "Account of a Negro-Boy that is dappel'd in several Places of his Body with White Spots" (1697)},
  author={Cristina Malcolmson},
  journal={Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies},
  year={2018},
  volume={18},
  pages={159 - 179}
}
abstract:William Byrd II grew up on his father's slave plantation in Virginia, secured his place in the Royal Society through publishing an "Account of a Negro-Boy" in the Philosophical Transactions in 1697, and inherited the plantations in 1704. The "Account" and his later diaries provide evidence that natural philosophy was one means by which Byrd established his authority as a colonist. The earlier "Account" displays Byrd's unstable but determined efforts to distinguish between white and… Expand

References