"No Irish Need Apply": A Myth of Victimization

@article{Jensen2002NoIN,
  title={"No Irish Need Apply": A Myth of Victimization},
  author={Richard Bach Jensen},
  journal={Journal of Social History},
  year={2002},
  volume={36},
  pages={405 - 429}
}
  • R. Jensen
  • Published 1 December 2002
  • History
  • Journal of Social History
Irish Catholics in America have a vibrant memory of humiliating job discrimination, which featured omnipresent signs proclaiming "Help Wanted--No Irish Need Apply!" No one has ever seen one of these NINA signs because they were extremely rare or nonexistent. The market for female household workers occasionally specified religion or nationality. Newspaper ads for women sometimes did include NINA, but Irish women nevertheless dominated the market for domestics because they provided a reliable… 

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