"My baby is a person": parents' experiences with life-threatening fetal diagnosis.

@article{CtArsenault2011MyBI,
  title={"My baby is a person": parents' experiences with life-threatening fetal diagnosis.},
  author={Denise C{\^o}t{\'e}-Arsenault and Erin Denney-Koelsch},
  journal={Journal of palliative medicine},
  year={2011},
  volume={14 12},
  pages={
          1302-8
        }
}
Diagnosis of a lethal fetal diagnosis (LFD) early in pregnancy is devastating for parents. Those who choose to continue with the pregnancy report intense emotional reactions and inconsistent, often insensitive treatment by health care providers. This qualitative descriptive study sought to clarify the experiences and needs of families in order to design responsive perinatal palliative care services, and to establish the feasibility and acceptability of conducting intensive interviews of… Expand
''My Baby Is a Person'': Parents' Experiences with Life-Threatening Fetal Diagnosis
TLDR
This qualitative descriptive study sought to clarify the experiences and needs of families in order to design responsive perinatal palliative care services, and to establish the feasibility and acceptability of conducting intensive interviews of pregnant women and their partners during their pregnancy with a LFD. Expand
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Parental Experiences and Needs After Life-Limiting Fetal Diagnosis
After receiving a life-limiting prenatal diagnosis, parents typically experience a swirl of emotions and need to make significant decisions about the remainder of the pregnancy and about their baby’sExpand
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