"Manzanar, the eyes of the world are upon you": Performance and Archival Ambivalence at a Japanese American Internment Camp

@article{ColbornRoxworthy2007ManzanarTE,
  title={"Manzanar, the eyes of the world are upon you": Performance and Archival Ambivalence at a Japanese American Internment Camp},
  author={Emily Colborn-Roxworthy},
  journal={Theatre Journal},
  year={2007},
  volume={59},
  pages={189 - 214}
}
In this essay, Emily Colborn-Roxworthy explores the self-conscious construction of Japanese American identities and internment performance in the internee-run Manzanar Free Press, which epitomized the camp newspapers independently published in each of the ten US relocation centers during World War II. In the face of political spectacularization and racist media slander, Colborn-Roxworthy argues that internee-journalists created a "spectacle-archive" that recorded the ambivalent scrutiny imposed… 
Ballad for Incarcerated Americans: Second Generation Japanese American Musicking in World War II Camps
  • M. Robertson
  • Sociology
    Journal of the Society for American Music
  • 2017
Abstract During World War II, the United States government imprisoned approximately 120,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens, half of whom were children. Through
Cultivating the Anti-campo: An Environmental Reading of “Internment Literature”
This chapter uses the ecocritical lens in order to analyze four narratives dealing with the massive incarceration of Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor: Monica Sone’s Nisei Daughter (1953), Jeanne
Diamonds at the margin of empires: ‘baseball complex’ in the Japanese American internment and colonized Taiwan
ABSTRACT This article studies baseball played at ‘the margin of empires.’ It attends to the manifestations of ‘baseball complex’ – the persistent sociopsychological affective force for baseball that
1954: Selling Kabuki to the West
In the face of an increasingly communist Asia, the Japanese government worked in 1954 with American kabuki aficionados and the Azuma Nihon Buyo Company to market kabuki to the United States as an
Louder and Faster: Pain, Joy, and the Body Politic in Asian American Taiko
Louder and Fasteris a cultural study of the phenomenon of Asian American taiko, the thundering, athletic drumming tradition that originated in Japan. Immersed in the taiko scene for twenty years,
Guns and guitars: Simulating sovereignty in a state of siege
We present an ethnographic examination of the Agambenian approach to sovereignty through the example of a particular “state of exception,” namely, the militarized Turkish Cypriot enclaves of the
Dislocating Camps: On State Power, Queer Aesthetics & Asian/Americanist Critique
........................................................................................................iv
A comparative study of Second World War internment experiences in Great Britain and the United States of America
................................................................................................................................................ 3 Acknowledgments

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 22 REFERENCES
The Manzanar Riot: An Ethnic Perspective
In his recent book, American Historical Explanations, Gene Wise reproves American historians for naively assuming that "the real aim of historical scholarship is to discover just what happened in the
National Abjection: The Asian American Body Onstage
National Abjection explores the vexed relationship between "Asian Americanness" and "Americanness” through a focus on drama and performance art. Karen Shimakawa argues that the forms of Asian
Trading "earnest Drama" for Prophecy: Performing Japanese American Internment After 9/11
Whether it sullies the endeavor or not, none of us are strangers to the savvy marketing move that contrives to frame our academic and theatrical work as crucially relevant to the contemporary world.
The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas
In The Archive and the Repertoire preeminent performance studies scholar Diana Taylor provides a new understanding of the vital role of performance in the Americas. From plays to official events to
Last Witnesses: Reflections on the Wartime Internment of Japanese Americans
Introduction E.Harth - PART I: PARENTS AND CHILDREN - Another Spring T.Suyemoto - Legacy of Silence (i) M,Yamada - Legacy of Silence (ii) J.Yamada - Echoes from Generation to Generation D.K Nagata -
The Location of Culture
Acknowledgements, Introduction: Locations of culture, 1. The commitment to theory, 2. Interrogating identity: Frantz Fanon and the postcolonial prerogative, 3. The other question: Stereotype,
Re/collecting Early Asian America: Essays in Cultural History
1. Introduction Yuko Matsukawa, Josephine Lee, and Imogene L. Lim Part I: Locations and Relocations 2. Pacific Entry, Pacific Century: Chinatown and Chinese Canadian History Imogene L. Lim 3. Chinese
Resistance, Collaboration, and Manzanar Protest
On the night of December 6, 1942, Togo Tanaka watched in disguise as a throng of people descended upon his barracks at the Manzanar internment camp for Japanese Americans. Well known for
Mapping Carnivalistic Discourse in Japanese−American Writing
Mikhail Bakhtin's theory of literary carnival, which has constantly been refined in recent developments of literary and cultural studies, presents a vision of literature as comprising various
From Behind Barbed Wire: Freedom of the Press in World War II Japanese Centers
In herding 110,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry-two-thirds of them American citizens-into makeshift detention centers during World War 11, the United States government created many problems. Not
...
...