"Loss of control" in alcoholism and drug addiction: a neuroscientific interpretation.

@article{Lyvers2000LossOC,
  title={"Loss of control" in alcoholism and drug addiction: a neuroscientific interpretation.},
  author={Michael Lyvers},
  journal={Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology},
  year={2000},
  volume={8 2},
  pages={
          225-49
        }
}
  • M. Lyvers
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine
  • Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology
Considerable neurological evidence indicates that the prefrontal cortex mediates complex "executive" functions including behavioral autonomy and self-control. Given that impairments of self-control are characteristic of alcoholism and other drug addictions, frontal lobe dysfunction may play a significant role in such compulsive behaviors. Consistent with this idea, recent research using brain imaging, neuropsychological testing, and other techniques has revealed that the frontal lobes are… Expand
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