"Living high-training low": effect of moderate-altitude acclimatization with low-altitude training on performance.

@article{Levine1997LivingHL,
  title={"Living high-training low": effect of moderate-altitude acclimatization with low-altitude training on performance.},
  author={B. Levine and J. Stray-gundersen},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={1997},
  volume={83 1},
  pages={
          102-12
        }
}
The principal objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that acclimatization to moderate altitude (2,500 m) plus training at low altitude (1,250 m), "living high-training low," improves sea-level performance in well-trained runners more than an equivalent sea-level or altitude control. Thirty-nine competitive runners (27 men, 12 women) completed 1) a 2-wk lead-in phase, followed by 2) 4 wk of supervised training at sea level; and 3) 4 wk of field training camp randomized to three… Expand
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