"Imaginary Geography" in Caesar's Bellum Gallicum

@article{Krebs2006ImaginaryGI,
  title={"Imaginary Geography" in Caesar's Bellum Gallicum},
  author={Christopher B. Krebs},
  journal={American Journal of Philology},
  year={2006},
  volume={127},
  pages={111 - 136}
}
  • C. Krebs
  • Published 2006
  • History
  • American Journal of Philology
Caesar"s "imaginary geography" of Germania as an infinite extension without any patterns but simply endless forests contrasts with his presentation of Gallia as an overviewed space. Within these geographies different concepts of space prevail, all of which serve to explain why his celeritas ceases in Germania. Having crossed the Rhine and thereby entered terra incognita like Alexander and Pompey, he refrains from campaigning because of the geographical conditions. By alluding to Scythia"s… Expand
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