"Go there tuh know there": Zora Neale Hurston and the Chronotope of the Folk

@article{Duck2001GoTT,
  title={"Go there tuh know there": Zora Neale Hurston and the Chronotope of the Folk},
  author={Leigh Anne Duck},
  journal={American Literary History},
  year={2001},
  volume={13},
  pages={265 - 294}
}
In his 1936 Opportunity review of Mules and Men (1935), Zora Neale Hurston's collection of southern African-American folklore and hoodoo practices, Alain Locke raises a concern still prevalent in the criticism of her work. Praising her knowledge of the "rare native material and local color," he nonetheless com- plains that the locale, as she presents it, is "too Arcadian," even "extinct" ("Deep River" 9). An influential and prolific critic, Locke called often for the artistic representation of… 
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