"Another Declaration of Independence": John Neal's Rachel Dyer and the Assault on Precedent

@article{Carlson2007AnotherDO,
  title={"Another Declaration of Independence": John Neal's Rachel Dyer and the Assault on Precedent},
  author={David J. Carlson},
  journal={Early American Literature},
  year={2007},
  volume={42},
  pages={405 - 434}
}
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References

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Now is the dreadful hour come, that I have often heard of but now mine eyes see it. Some in our house were fighting for their lives, others wallowing in their blood, the house on fire over our heads,
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