"All His Workes Sir": John Taylor's Nonsense

@article{Hartle2002AllHW,
  title={"All His Workes Sir": John Taylor's Nonsense},
  author={Paul Hartle},
  journal={Neophilologus},
  year={2002},
  volume={86},
  pages={155-170}
}
This paper uses the long Nonsense-writing career of Taylor to discuss the political and cultural uses of Nonsense, tracing shifts internal to the genre which testify to Taylor's increasing sense of disillusion and despair as the royalist cause for which he was so robust an apologist frays into apparently final desuetude. Early Nonsense works like the "Utopian" unknown tongue of the squibs directed at Thomas Coryate or Sir Gregory Nonsence His Newes from No Place (all republished in the 1630… 

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