Corpus ID: 55448488

"Ah ain't heard whut de tex' wuz": The (Il)legitimate Textuality of Old English and Black English

@inproceedings{Saenger1999AhAH,
  title={"Ah ain't heard whut de tex' wuz": The (Il)legitimate Textuality of Old English and Black English},
  author={Michael Saenger},
  year={1999}
}
“Oral literature” is an uncomfortable pair of words; Walter Ong goes so far as to suggest that the phrase is “self-contradictory” (1982:13). Orality has gained legitimacy as an object of critical inquiry, but as long as critics are located in universities, they must, like archeologists, rely (however suspiciously) on transcriptions and try to piece out the gap between the fossil (the textual record) and the vanished life form (real oral performance) that it claims to record. In this essay I… Expand
1 Citations
Bibliography for 2000

References

SHOWING 1-9 OF 9 REFERENCES
Orality and the Developing Text of Caedmon's Hymn
  • 15
Negro: An Anthology
  • 49
The Singer of Tales in Performance
  • 201
A Furified Freestyle: Homer and Hip Hop
  • 30
  • PDF
Jonah's Gourd Vine
  • 52
Reading Cædmon's "Hymn" with Someone Else's Glosses
  • 22
Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Biography
  • 146
Introduction by Larry Neal
  • Philadelphia: Lippincott. Rpt
  • 1971