Zila Martínez-Lozada

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Glutamate, the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, is removed from the synaptic cleft by a family of sodium-dependent glutamate transporters profusely expressed in glial cells. Once internalized, it is metabolized by glutamine synthetase to glutamine and released to the synaptic space through sodium-dependent neutral amino acid carriers of(More)
Glutamate, the major excitatory amino acid, activates a wide variety of signal transduction cascades. Synaptic plasticity relies on activity-dependent differential protein expression. Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors have been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes, although recent findings suggest that the electrogenic(More)
Glu (glutamate), the excitatory transmitter at the main signalling pathway in the retina, is critically involved in changes in the protein repertoire through the activation of signalling cascades, which regulate protein synthesis at transcriptional and translational levels. Activity-dependent differential gene expression by Glu is related to the activation(More)
Glutamate (Glu), the major excitatory amino acid, activates a wide variety of signal transduction cascades. Synaptic plasticity relies on activity-dependent differential protein expression. Glu receptors have been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes, although recent findings suggest that Na+-dependent Glu transporters participate in(More)
Signaling via the major excitatory amino acid glutamate has been implicated in the regulation of various aspects of the biology of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS). In this respect, cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage have been described to express a variety of glutamate-responsive transmembrane proteins including(More)
Glutamate, the major excitatory amino acid, activates a wide variety of signal transduction cascades. Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors are critically involved in long-term synaptic changes, although recent findings suggest that the electrogenic Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for its removal from the synaptic cleft(More)
Neuron-secreted factors induce astrocytic expression of the glutamate transporter, GLT-1 (EAAT2). In addition to their elaborate anatomic relationships with neurons, astrocytes also have processes that extend to and envelop the vasculature. Although previous studies have demonstrated that brain endothelia contribute to astrocyte differentiation and(More)
Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. It mediates essentially all rapid excitatory signaling. Dysfunction of glutamatergic signaling contributes to developmental, neurologic, and psychiatric diseases. Extracellular glutamate is cleared by a family of five Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters. Two of these(More)
Glutamate, the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain is a potent neurotoxin through the over-stimulation of its specific membrane receptors. In accordance, a tight regulation of its extracellular levels by plasma membrane transporters is present. A family of excitatory amino acid transporters is expressed in neurons and glia cells and is(More)