Zaoshi Yuan

  • Citations Per Year
Learn More
Impurities segregated to grain boundaries of a material essentially alter its fracture behavior. A prime example is sulfur segregation-induced embrittlement of nickel, where an observed relation between sulfur-induced amorphization of grain boundaries and embrittlement remains unexplained. Here, 48x10(6)-atom reactive-force-field molecular dynamics(More)
Generation of stacking faults (SFs) during the growth of nanowires (NWs) is a major concern for the efficiency of NW-based devices such as solar cells. Here, molecular-dynamics simulation of a [111]-oriented gallium arsenide NW reveals an atomistic mechanism of SF generation. Spatial distribution of the adatom energy on the (111)B top surface exhibits a(More)
electronic properties in GaAs nanosheets on Si substrate Zaoshi Yuan, Kohei Shimamura, Fuyuki Shimojo, and Aiichiro Nakano Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles,(More)
Kohei Shimamura, Zaoshi Yuan, Fuyuki Shimojo, and Aiichiro Nakano Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242, USA Department of Physics, Kumamoto(More)
Nanowires (NWs) exhibit thermo-mechanical properties that are distinct from their bulk properties, and their understanding is critical for the reliability, manufacturability, and optimization of a wide range of devices consisting of NWs. Here, molecular-dynamics simulation reveals a rich size-temperature “phase diagram” for the mechanical response of a(More)
Based on molecular-dynamics simulations validated with quantum-mechanical calculations, we predict that (111) twin planes in a [111]-oriented GaAs nanowire attain attractive interactions mediated by surface strain. This gives rise to a self-replication mechanism that continuously generates a twin superlattice in a nanowire during growth. We demonstrate(More)
  • 1