Yves Clément

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There are large-scale variations of the GC-content along mammalian chromosomes that have been called isochore structures. Primates and rodents have different isochore structures, which suggests that these lineages exhibit different modes of GC-content evolution. It has been shown that, in the human lineage, GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC), a neutral(More)
In grasses such as rice or maize, the distribution of genic GC content is well known to be bimodal. It is mainly driven by GC content at third codon positions (GC3 for short). This feature is thought to be specific to grasses as closely related species like banana have a unimodal GC3 distribution. GC3 is associated with numerous genomics features and(More)
Meiotic recombination is known to influence GC-content evolution in large regions of mammalian genomes by favoring the fixation of G and C alleles and increasing the rate of A/T to G/C substitutions. This process is known as GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC). Until recently, genome-wide measures of fine-scale recombination activity were unavailable in mice.(More)
In angiosperms (as in other species), GC content varies along and between genes, within a genome, and between genomes of different species, but the reason for this distribution is still an open question. Grass genomes are particularly intriguing because they exhibit a strong bimodal distribution of genic GC content and a sharp 5'-3' decreasing GC content(More)
Characteristic changes in the basic nuclear proteins/DNA ratio may be observed during the residual growth of lupine seedling hypocotyls. This ratio decreases at the very beginning of hypocotyl growth (growth initiation) but increases during its active growth. A second decline coincides with gemmule development. No further increase in the relative amount of(More)
Meiotic recombination is known to influence GC-content evolution in large regions of mammalian genomes by favoring the fixation of G and C alleles and increasing the rate of A/T to G/C substitutions. This process is known as GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC). Until recently, genome-wide measures of fine-scale recombination activity were unavailable in mice.(More)
Base composition is highly variable among and within plant genomes, especially at third codon positions, ranging from GC-poor and homogeneous species to GC-rich and highly heterogeneous ones (particularly Monocots). Consequently, synonymous codon usage is biased in most species, even when base composition is relatively homogeneous. The causes of these(More)
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