Yuto Momohara

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Using pairings of male crayfish Procambarus clarkii with a 3-7% difference in size, we confirmed that physically larger crayfish were more likely to win encounters (winning probability of over 80%). Despite a physical disadvantage, small winners of the first pairings were more likely to win their subsequent conflicts with larger naive animals (winning(More)
For territorial animals, establishment of status-dependent dominance order is essential to maintain social stability. In agonistic encounters of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, a difference of body length of 3-7% is enough for larger animals to become dominant. Despite a physical disadvantage, small winners of the first pairings were more likely to win(More)
Small crayfish usually showed escape-like dart responses to mechanical stimulation of the tailfan. Following agonistic bouts with conspecifics, dominant crayfish showed a defensive-like turn response to the same sensory stimulus. During the dart response, both uropods closed and animals walked forwards with the abdomen extended, while during the turn(More)
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