Yusuf Walakira

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In 1992 the Islamic Medical Association of Uganda designed an AIDS prevention project and conducted a baseline survey prior to community level activities. Results of that baseline were previously reported in this journal. During 2 years of prevention activities in local Muslim communities, 23 trainers educated over 3,000 religious leaders and their(More)
BACKGROUND The Islamic Medical Association of Uganda, has been implementing the faith-based approach to HIV prevention without baseline data on expected positive outcomes. OBJECTIVES To establish evidence-based baseline data on expected positive outcomes of the faith-based approach to HIV prevention. METHODS A cross-sectional study of 15-24 year-old(More)
BACKGROUND Utilization of religious institutions is one of the strategies for HIV prevention in Uganda. There is limited data on the association between religiosity and HIV infection rates. OBJECTIVE To determine the association between religiosity and HIV prevalence rates among Christians. METHODS An unmatched case-control study was done. Data from 106(More)
BACKGROUND Evidence for the association between religiosity and HIV infections is limited. Sujda, the hyper-pigmented spot on the forehead due to repeated prostration during prayers and fasting to worship, involving abstaining from food, drink and sex during daytime in Ramadhan and other specified days, are measures of religiosity among Muslims OBJECTIVES(More)
The study was done to determine the association between religiosity and behaviors likely to reduce new HIV infections among 1,224 Muslim youth. Respondents with Sujda, the hyperpigmented spot on the forehead due to prostration during prayers, were more likely to abstain from sex, be faithful in marriage, and avoid alcohol and narcotics. Males wearing a(More)
Inter-religious cooperation has been recommended to address various issues for the common good. Muslims and Christians in Uganda are working together on HIV prevention in this spirit. A study was done to compare HIV prevalence and HIV-risk behaviors between Muslims and Christians. A total of 2,933 Christian and 1,224 Muslim youth between 15–24 years were(More)
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