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Heavy chain deposition disease (HCDD) is characterized by glomerular and tubular deposition of non-amyloidotic monoclonal heavy chains without associated light chains. We describe a case of gamma1-HCDD who presented with nephrotic syndrome, microhematuria, and hypocomplementemia. Renal biopsy showed lobular and nodular glomerulosclerosis along with IgG and(More)
Heavy chain deposition disease (HCDD) is one of three entities of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease, characterized histopathologically by the presence of nodular glomerulosclerosis and glomerular and tubular deposition of monoclonal heavy chains without associated light chains. Although HCDD is an extremely rare disease, >30 cases have been(More)
Sarcopenia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Pathogenic mechanism of skeletal muscle loss in CKD, which is defined as uremic sarcopenia, remains unclear. We found that causative pathological mechanism of uremic sarcopenia is metabolic alterations by uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate. Imaging mass spectrometry(More)
Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-induced hypertension with proteinuria that typically develops after 20 weeks of gestation. A reduction in uterine blood flow causes placental ischemia and placental release of anti-angiogenic factors such as sFlt-1 followed by PE. Although the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model is widely used in rats,(More)
OBJECTIVE The role of hypercoagulability in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) remains elusive. We recently reported the increased infiltration of macrophages expressing tissue factor in diabetic kidney glomeruli; tissue factor activates coagulation factor X (FX) to FXa, which in turn stimulates protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) and causes(More)
Hypercoagulability is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Tissue factor/factor VIIa complex and factor Xa in the coagulation cascade are known to activate protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), and to cause inflammation and tissue injury. Although PAR2 is highly expressed in the kidney, it is unclear whether PAR2 plays a pathogenic role in CKD. To(More)
Preeclampsia (PE) complicates ∼5% of human pregnancies and is one of the leading causes of pregnancy-related maternal deaths. The only definitive treatment, induced delivery, invariably results in prematurity, and in severe early-onset cases may lead to fetal death. Many currently available antihypertensive drugs are teratogenic and therefore precluded from(More)
Preeclampsia (PE) is pregnancy-induced hypertension with proteinuria that typically develops after 20 wk of gestation. Antihypertensives currently used for PE reduce blood pressure of PE mothers but do not prevent preterm delivery and do not alleviate fetal growth restriction (FGR) associated with PE. We have recently shown that the activation of the(More)
OBJECTIVE Preeclampsia (PE) is pregnancy-induced hypertension with proteinuria. It causes maternal death or fetal growth restriction (FGR). Although high BP can be managed with antihypertensive drugs, there is no effective treatment of FGR associated with PE. We have clarified that nicotinamide (Nam) alleviates PE-like condition and FGR induced by soluble(More)
A 48-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia presented with nephrotic syndrome, hematuria, and mild deterioration of renal function. Further analysis using serum immunofixation electrophoresis detected monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) M-κ and IgG-κ M-protein. Testing for cryoglobulin in serum was negative. Light microscopy of a renal biopsy specimen(More)