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Why do populations remain genetically variable despite strong continuous natural selection? Mutation reconstitutes variation eliminated by selection and genetic drift, but theoretical and experimental studies each suggest that mutation-selection balance insufficient to explain extant genetic variation in most complex traits. The alternative hypothesis of(More)
Evolution of genetic (co)variances (the G-matrix) fundamentally influences multitrait divergence. Here, we isolated the contribution of two chromosomal quantitative trait loci (QTLs), a meiotic drive locus and a polymorphic inversion, to the overall G-matrix for a suite of floral, phenological and male fitness traits in a population of Mimulus guttatus.(More)
Polymorphic chromosomal rearrangements can bind hundreds of genes into single genetic loci with diverse effects. Rearrangements are often associated with local adaptation and speciation and may also be an important component of genetic variation within populations. We genetically and phenotypically characterize a segregating inversion (inv6) in the Iron(More)
Most natural populations display substantial genetic variation in behaviour, morphology, physiology, life history and the susceptibility to disease. A major challenge is to determine the contributions of individual loci to variation in complex traits. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping has identified genomic regions affecting ecologically significant(More)
Polymorphic chromosomal rearrangements, which can bind together hundreds of genes into single genetic loci with diverse effects, are increasingly associated with local adaptation and speciation. They may also be an important component of genetic variation within populations. We genetically and phenotypically characterized a novel segregating inversion(More)
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