Youenn Lohéac

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Many years of concerted policy effort in Western countries has not prevented young people from experimenting with cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana. One potential explanation is that social interactions make consumption "sticky". We use detailed panel data from the Add Health survey to examine risky behavior (the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and(More)
This paper focuses on decision making under risk, comparing group and individual risk preferences in a lottery-choice experiment inspired by Holt and Laury (2002). The experiment presents subjects with a menu of unordered lottery choices which allows us to measure risk aversion. In the individual treatment, subjects make lottery choices individually; in the(More)
In rational addiction theory, higher discount rates encourage drug use. We test this hypothesis in the general framework of rationality and behaviour under risk. We do so using an experimental design with real monetary incentives. The decisions of 34 drug addicts are compared with those of a control group. The decisions of drug users (DU) are not any less(More)
School dissatisfaction is an important component of the subjective well-being of adolescents associated with ‘‘risky behavior’’ like drug use, unprotected sex, norm violations and illegal behavior. We extend the standard human capital model to joint human investment (education) and disinvestment (risky behavior). Based on this model, we develop a general(More)
Institutional information does not seem to prevent drug experimentation. We use Add Health panel data (1994-1996) to examine risky behaviour by adolescents (the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and marijuana). We find that such behaviours are correlated with the (lagged) behaviour of three peer groups: others in the same school year; others one school year(More)
“It Wasn’t Me, It Was Them!” Social Influence in Risky Behavior by Adolescents Many years of concerted policy effort in Western countries has not prevented young people from experimenting with cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana. One potential explanation is that social interactions make consumption “sticky”. We use detailed panel data from the Add Health(More)
Despite many years of concerted effort, government policy in Western countries has not dissuaded adolescents from experimenting with cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana. We use very rich and detailed panel data from the Add Health survey to examine risky behaviour by American adolescents (the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and marijuana). We find that, even(More)
Institutional information does not seem sufficient to prevent drug experimentation by adolescents. A key question is therefore how adolescents decide to experiment with drugs, or, in general, adopt risky behaviours. We use the Add Health panel dataset (1994-1996) to show that risky behaviour by adolescents (the consumption of tobacco, alcohol and marijuana)(More)
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