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The specificity of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) is determined spatially by the vascular architecture and temporally by the evolution of hemodynamic changes. The stimulus duration has additional influence on the spatiotemporal evolution of the HRF, as brief stimuli elicit responses that engage only the local vasculature, whereas long stimuli lead(More)
High field (> or =7 T) MRI studies based on signal phase have been used to improve visualization of the fine structure of the brain, most notably the major white matter fiber bundles, the gray-white matter subdivision, and the laminar cortical architecture. The observed contrast has been attributed in part to local variations in magnetic susceptibility(More)
Functional neuroimaging in animal models is essential for understanding the principles of neurovascular coupling and the physiological basis of fMRI signals that are widely used to study sensory and cognitive processing in the human brain. While hemodynamic responses to sensory stimuli have been characterized in humans, animal studies are able to combine(More)
The spatiotemporal characteristics of the hemodynamic response to increased neural activity were investigated at the level of individual intracortical vessels using BOLD-fMRI in a well-established rodent model of somatosensory stimulation at 11.7 T. Functional maps of the rat barrel cortex were obtained at 150 × 150 × 500 μm spatial resolution every 200 ms.(More)
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has had an essential role in furthering our understanding of brain physiology and function. fMRI techniques are nowadays widely applied in neuroscience research, as well as in translational and clinical studies. The use of animal models in fMRI studies has been fundamental in helping elucidate the mechanisms of(More)
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