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During transduction of an apoptotic (death) signal into the cell, there is an alteration in the permeability of the membranes of the cell's mitochondria, which causes the translocation of the apoptogenic protein cytochrome c into the cytoplasm, which in turn activates death-driving proteolytic proteins known as caspases. The Bcl-2 family of proteins, whose(More)
Programmed cell death can be divided into several categories including type I (apoptosis) and type II (autophagic death). The Bcl-2 family of proteins are well-characterized regulators of apoptosis, and the multidomain pro-apoptotic members of this family, such as Bax and Bak, act as a mitochondrial gateway where a variety of apoptotic signals converge.(More)
Mitochondria play an important role in energy production, Ca2+ homeostasis and cell death. In recent years, the role of the mitochondria in apoptotic and necrotic cell death has attracted much attention. In apoptosis and necrosis, the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT), which leads to disruption of the mitochondrial membranes and mitochondrial(More)
Cytochrome c release and the mitochondrial permeability transition (PT), including loss of the transmembrane potential (Deltapsi), play an important role in apoptosis. Using isolated mitochondria, we found that recombinant Bax and Bak, proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, induced mitochondrial Deltapsi loss, swelling, and cytochrome c release. All of(More)
In recent years, the role of the mitochondria in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death has received considerable attention. An increase of mitochondrial membrane permeability is one of the key events in apoptotic or necrotic death, although the details of the mechanism involved remain to be elucidated. The mitochondrial membrane permeability transition(More)
A change of mitochondrial membrane permeability is essential for apoptosis, leading to translocation of apoptogenic cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor into the cytoplasm. We recently showed that the Bcl-2 family of proteins regulate cytochrome c release and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi) by directly modulating the activity of the(More)
Through direct interaction with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family such as Bax and Bak induce apoptogenic cytochrome c release in isolated mitochondria, whereas BH3-only proteins such as Bid and Bik do not directly target the VDAC to induce cytochrome c release. To investigate the biological significance of(More)
Although apoptosis and necrosis are morphologically distinct manifestations of cell death, apoptosis and some necroses share common features in the death signaling pathway involving functional steps of death-driving interleukin 1beta-converting enzyme family proteases and anti-cell death protein Bcl-2. One evident physiological difference in cells(More)
Apoptosis is defined by several unique morphological nuclear changes, such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation. These changes are triggered by the activation of a family of cysteine proteases called caspases, and caspase-activated DNase (CAD/DFF40) and lamin protease (caspase-6) have been implicated in some of these changes. CAD/DFF40(More)
From an acute B-cell leukemia cell line, a DNA probe was obtained that was specific for chromosome 18 and flanked the heavy chain joining region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus on chromosome 14. This probe detected rearrangement of the homologous DNA segment in the leukemic cells and in follicular lymphoma cells with the t(14:18) chromosome(More)