Yasuo Uchiyama

Learn More
Autophagy is a membrane-trafficking mechanism that delivers cytoplasmic constituents into the lysosome/vacuole for bulk protein degradation. This mechanism is involved in the preservation of nutrients under starvation condition as well as the normal turnover of cytoplasmic component. Aberrant autophagy has been reported in several neurodegenerative(More)
Research in autophagy continues to accelerate,(1) and as a result many new scientists are entering the field. Accordingly, it is important to establish a standard set of criteria for monitoring macroautophagy in different organisms. Recent reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose.(2,3) There are many useful and(More)
Protein quality-control, especially the removal of proteins with aberrant structures, has an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of non-dividing neural cells. In addition to the ubiquitin-proteasome system, emerging evidence points to the importance of autophagy--the bulk protein degradation pathway involved in starvation-induced and constitutive(More)
Inactivation of constitutive autophagy results in formation of cytoplasmic protein inclusions and leads to liver injury and neurodegeneration, but the details of abnormalities related to impaired autophagy are largely unknown. Here we used mouse genetic analyses to define the roles of autophagy in the aforementioned events. We report that the ubiquitin- and(More)
Macroautophagy, which is a lysosomal pathway for the turnover of organelles and long-lived proteins, is a key determinant of cell survival and longevity. In this study, we show that neuronal macroautophagy is induced early in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and before beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits extracellularly in the presenilin (PS) 1/Abeta precursor protein(More)
Macroautophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway essential for neuron survival. Here, we show that macroautophagy requires the Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related protein presenilin-1 (PS1). In PS1 null blastocysts, neurons from mice hypomorphic for PS1 or conditionally depleted of PS1, substrate proteolysis and autophagosome clearance during macroautophagy(More)
Unilateral hypoxia–ischemia (HI) was induced in C57/BL6 male mice on postnatal day (P) 5, 9, 21 and 60, corresponding developmentally to premature, term, juvenile and adult human brains, respectively. HI duration was adjusted to obtain a similar extent of brain injury at all ages. Apoptotic mechanisms (nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor,(More)
Cathepsin D-deficient (CD-/-) mice have been shown to manifest seizures and become blind near the terminal stage [approximately postnatal day (P) 26]. We therefore examined the morphological, immunocytochemical, and biochemical features of CNS tissues of these mice. By electron microscopy, autophagosome/autolysosome-like bodies containing part of the(More)
Homologues of the Musashi family of RNA-binding proteins are evolutionarily conserved across species. In mammals, two members of this family, Musashi1 (Msi1) and Musashi2 (Msi2), are strongly coexpressed in neural precursor cells, including CNS stem cells. To address the in vivo roles of msi in neural development, we generated mice with a targeted(More)
In programmed cell death, a large number of cells undergo apoptosis, and are engulfed by macrophages to avoid the release of noxious materials from the dying cells. In definitive erythropoiesis, nuclei are expelled from erythroid precursor cells and are engulfed by macrophages. Phosphatidylserine is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and on the(More)