Yannick R. Brunet

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Type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are bacteriophage-derived macromolecular machines responsible for the release of at least two proteins in the milieu, which are thought to form an extracellular appendage. Although several T6SS have been shown to be involved in the virulence of animal and plant pathogens, clusters encoding these machines are found in the(More)
The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a complex and widespread gram-negative bacterial export pathway with the capacity to translocate protein effectors into a diversity of target cell types. Current structural models of the T6SS indicate that the apparatus is composed of at least two complexes, a dynamic bacteriophage-like structure and a(More)
Type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are macromolecular, transenvelope machines encoded within the genomes of most Gram-negative bacteria, including plant, animal, and human pathogens, as well as soil and environmental isolates. T6SS are involved in a broad variety of functions: from pathogenesis to biofilm formation and stress sensing. This large array of(More)
The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) delivers protein effectors to diverse cell types including prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, therefore it participates in inter-bacterial competition and pathogenesis. The T6SS is constituted of an envelope-spanning complex anchoring a cytoplasmic tubular edifice. This tubular structure is evolutionarily, functionally and(More)
The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread macromolecular structure that delivers protein effectors to both eukaryotic and prokaryotic recipient cells. The current model describes the T6SS as an inverted phage tail composed of a sheath-like structure wrapped around a tube assembled by stacked Hcp hexamers. Although recent progress has been made to(More)
Contractile tails are composed of an inner tube wrapped by an outer sheath assembled in an extended, metastable conformation that stores mechanical energy necessary for its contraction. Contraction is used to propel the rigid inner tube towards target cells for DNA or toxin delivery. Although recent studies have revealed the structure of the contractile(More)
The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine that mediates bacteria-host or bacteria-bacteria interactions. The T6SS core apparatus assembles from 13 proteins that form two sub-assemblies: a phage-like complex and a trans-envelope complex. The Hcp, VgrG, TssE, and TssB/C subunits are structurally and functionally related to components of(More)
The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread weapon dedicated to the delivery of toxin proteins into eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. The 13 T6SS subunits assemble a cytoplasmic contractile structure anchored to the cell envelope by a membrane-spanning complex. This structure is evolutionarily, structurally and functionally related to the tail of(More)
The secretion of bacterial toxin proteins is achieved by dedicated machineries called secretion systems. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a widespread versatile machine used for the delivery of protein toxins to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the expression of the T6SS genes is activated during(More)
In the environment, bacteria compete with each other for nutrient availability or to extend their ecological niche. The type VI secretion system contributes to bacterial competition by the translocation of antibacterial effectors from predators into prey cells. The T6SS assembles a dynamic structure-the sheath-wrapped around a tube constituted of the Hcp(More)