Yann Facchinello

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BACKGROUND Spinal disorders can be treated by several means including fusion surgery. Rigid posterior instrumentations are used to obtain the stability needed for fusion. However, the abrupt stiffness variation between the stabilized and intact segments leads to proximal junctional kyphosis. The concept of spinal rods with variable flexural stiffness is(More)
BACKGROUND Rigid posterior implants used for spinal stabilization can be anchored to the vertebrae using pedicle screws or screws combined with transverse process hooks. In the present study, a finite element model of a porcine lumbar spine instrumented with screws and hooks is presented and validated. METHODS The porcine lumbar spine model was validated(More)
In vitro replication of traumatic spinal cord injury is necessary to understand its biomechanics and to improve animal models. During a traumatic spinal cord injury, the spinal cord withstands an impaction at high velocity. In order to fully assess the impaction, the use of spinal canal occlusion sensor is necessary. A physical spinal cord surrogate is also(More)
The concept of a monolithic Ti-Ni spinal rod with variable flexural stiffness is proposed to reduce the risks associated with spinal fusion. The variable stiffness is conferred to the rod using the Joule-heating local annealing technique. The annealing temperature and the mechanical properties' distributions resulted from this thermal treatment are(More)
The concept of a monolithic Ti-Ni spinal rod with variable flexural stiffness is proposed to reduce the risks associated with spinal fusion. The variable stiffness is conferred to the rod using the Joule-heating local annealing technique. To assess the stabilization capacity of such a spinal rod, in vitro experiments on porcine spine models are carried out.(More)
A new concept of monolithic spinal rod with variable flexural stiffness is proposed to reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration and fracture associated with rigid spinal fixation techniques while providing adequate stability to the spine. The concept is based on the use of Ti-Ni shape memory alloy rods subjected to different processing schedules(More)
UNLABELLED Rigid instrumentations have been widely used for spinal fusion but they come with complications, such as adjacent disc degeneration. Dynamic instrumentations have been tested but their efficiency (stabilization capability) and reliability (mechanical integrity of the implant) have yet to be proven. A monolithic Ti-Ni spinal rod with variable(More)
Monolithic superelastic-elastoplastic spinal rods (MSER) are promising candidates to provide (i) dynamic stabilisation in spinal segments prone to mechanical stress concentration and adjacent segment disease and (ii) to provide fusion-ready stabilization in spinal segments at risk of implant failure. However, the stiffness distributions along the rod's(More)
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