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MazF cleaves cellular mRNAs specifically at ACA to block protein synthesis in Escherichia coli.
Escherichia coli contains operons called "addiction modules," encoding toxin and antitoxin, which are responsible for growth arrest and cell death. Here, we demonstrate that MazF toxin encoded byExpand
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SAP30, a novel protein conserved between human and yeast, is a component of a histone deacetylase complex.
Histone acetylation plays a key role in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Recently, histone acetylation and deacetylation were found to be catalyzed by structurally distinct, multisubunitExpand
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Conformational changes of the flavivirus E glycoprotein.
Dengue virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family, has a surface composed of 180 copies each of the envelope (E) glycoprotein and the membrane (M) protein. The crystal structure of an N-terminalExpand
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Bacterial toxin YafQ is an endoribonuclease that associates with the ribosome and blocks translation elongation through sequence‐specific and frame‐dependent mRNA cleavage
Toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems on the chromosomes of free‐living bacteria appear to facilitate cell survival during intervals of stress by inducing a state of reversible growth arrest. However, uponExpand
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Insights into the mRNA Cleavage Mechanism by MazF, an mRNA Interferase*
MazF is an Escherichia coli toxin that is highly conserved among the prokaryotes and plays an important role in growth regulation. When MazF is induced, protein synthesis is effectively inhibited.Expand
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Structural mechanism of transcriptional autorepression of the Escherichia coli RelB/RelE antitoxin/toxin module.
The Escherichia coli chromosomal relBE operon encodes a toxin-antitoxin system, which is autoregulated by its protein products, RelB and RelE. RelB acts as a transcriptional repressor and RelEExpand
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NBK/BIK antagonizes MCL-1 and BCL-XL and activates BAK-mediated apoptosis in response to protein synthesis inhibition.
Ribonucleases, antibiotics, bacterial toxins, and viruses inhibit protein synthesis, which results in apoptosis in mammalian cells. How the BCL-2 family of proteins regulates apoptosis in response toExpand
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Interference of mRNA Function by Sequence-specific Endoribonuclease PemK*
In Escherichia coli, programmed cell death is mediated through the system called “addiction module,” which consists of a pair of genes encoding a stable toxin and a labile antitoxin. The pemI-pemKExpand
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Characterization of the Interactions within the mazEF Addiction Module of Escherichia coli*
In bacteria, programmed cell death is mediated through the unique genetic system called “addiction module,” which consists of a pair of genes encoding a stable toxin and an unstable antitoxin. TheExpand
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The Inhibitory Mechanism of Protein Synthesis by YoeB, an Escherichia coli Toxin*
YoeB is a toxin encoded by the yefM-yoeB antitoxin-toxin operon in the Escherichia coli genome. Here we show that YoeB, a highly potent protein synthesis inhibitor, specifically blocks translationExpand
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