Yīmíng Bào

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Influenza epidemics cause morbidity and mortality worldwide (4). Each year in the United States, more than 200,000 patients are admitted to hospitals because of influenza and there are approximately 36,000 influenza-related deaths (14). In recent years, several subtypes of avian influenza viruses have jumped host species to infect humans. The H5N1 subtype,(More)
Understanding the evolution of influenza A viruses in humans is important for surveillance and vaccine strain selection. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of 156 complete genomes of human H3N2 influenza A viruses collected between 1999 and 2004 from New York State, United States, and observed multiple co-circulating clades with different population(More)
Systemic symptoms induced on Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are modulated by one or both amino-coterminal viral 126- and 183-kDa proteins: proteins involved in virus replication and cell-to-cell movement. Here we compare the systemic accumulation and gene silencing characteristics of TMV strains and mutants that express altered(More)
Influenza viruses are remarkably adept at surviving in the human population over a long timescale. The human influenza A virus continues to thrive even among populations with widespread access to vaccines, and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The virus mutates from year to year, making the existing vaccines ineffective on a regular(More)
In 2016, the order Mononegavirales was emended through the addition of two new families (Mymonaviridae and Sunviridae), the elevation of the paramyxoviral subfamily Pneumovirinae to family status (Pneumoviridae), the addition of five free-floating genera (Anphevirus, Arlivirus, Chengtivirus, Crustavirus, and Wastrivirus), and several other changes at the(More)
The RefSeq project at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) maintains and curates a publicly available database of annotated genomic, transcript, and protein sequence records (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/refseq/). The RefSeq project leverages the data submitted to the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC)(More)
PAirwise Sequence Comparison (PASC) is a tool that uses genome sequence similarity to help with virus classification. The PASC tool at NCBI uses two methods: local alignment based on BLAST and global alignment based on Needleman-Wunsch algorithm. It works for complete genomes of viruses of several families/groups, and for the family of Filoviridae, it(More)
Virus Variation (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genomes/VirusVariation/) is a comprehensive, web-based resource designed to support the retrieval and display of large virus sequence datasets. The resource includes a value added database, a specialized search interface and a suite of sequence data displays. Virus-specific sequence annotation and database(More)
In 2014, Ebola virus (EBOV) was identified as the etiological agent of a large and still expanding outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa and a much more confined EVD outbreak in Middle Africa. Epidemiological and evolutionary analyses confirmed that all cases of both outbreaks are connected to a single introduction each of EBOV into human(More)