Xuezheng Song

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Microarrays of defined glycans represent a high throughput approach to determining the specificity of lectins, or more generally glycan-binding proteins (GBPs). The utility of a glycan microarray is directly related to the number and variety of the glycans available on the printed surface for interrogation by GBPs. The Consortium for Functional Glycomics(More)
Major challenges of glycomics are to characterize a glycome and identify functional glycans as ligands for glycan-binding proteins (GBPs). To address these issues we developed a general strategy termed shotgun glycomics. We focus on glycosphingolipids (GSLs), a class of glycoconjugates that is challenging to study, recognized by toxins, antibodies and GBPs.(More)
Galectin-1 (Gal-1) and galectin-3 (Gal-3) are widely expressed galectins with immunoregulatory functions in animals. To explore their glycan specificity, we developed microarrays of naturally occurring glycans using a bifunctional fluorescent linker, 2-amino-N-(2-aminoethyl)-benzamide (AEAB), directly conjugated through its arylamine group by reductive(More)
A glycan microarray was developed by using 2,6-diaminopyridine (DAP) as a fluorescent linker and printing of the glycan-DAP conjugates (GDAPs) on epoxy-activated glass slides. Importantly, all coupled GDAPs showed a detectable level of concentration-dependent GDAP fluorescence under blue laser excitation (495 nm) that can be used for both grid location and(More)
Many glycan-binding proteins in animals and pathogens recognize sialic acid or its modified forms, but their molecular recognition is poorly understood. Here we describe studies on sialic acid recognition using a novel sialylated glycan microarray containing modified sialic acids presented on different glycan backbones. Glycans terminating in β-linked(More)
DNA and protein arrays are commonly accepted as powerful exploratory tools in research. This has mainly been achieved by the establishment of proper guidelines for quality control, allowing cross-comparison between different array platforms. As a natural extension, glycan microarrays were subsequently developed, and recent advances using such arrays have(More)
The 300-kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR), which contains multiple mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) binding sites that map to domains 3, 5, and 9 within its 15-domain extracytoplasmic region, functions as an efficient carrier of Man-6-P-containing lysosomal enzymes. To determine the types of phosphorylated N-glycans recognized by(More)
A novel strategy for creating naturally derived glycan microarrays has been developed. Glycosylamines are prepared from free reducing glycans and stabilized by reaction with acryloyl chloride to generate a glycosylamide in which the reducing monosaccharide has a closed-ring structure. Ozonolysis of the protected glycan yields an active aldehyde, to which a(More)
The specificity of the cation-independent and -dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptors (CI-MPR and CD-MPR) for high mannose-type N-glycans of defined structure containing zero, one, or two Man-P-GlcNAc phosphodiester or Man-6-P phosphomonoester residues was determined by analysis on a phosphorylated glycan microarray. Amine-activated glycans were covalently(More)
The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be read by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. We used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but interacts with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on(More)