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—As networks become ubiquitous in people's lives, users depend on networks a lot for sufficient communication and convenient information access. However, networks suffer from security issues. Network security becomes a challenging topic since numerous new network attacks have appeared increasingly sophisticated and caused vast loss to network resources.(More)
In this paper, inspired by the society of animals, we study the coalition formation of robots for detecting intrusions using game theory. We consider coalition formation in a group of three robots that detect and capture intrusions in a closed curve loop. In our analytical model, individuals seek alliances if they think that their detect regions are too(More)
Although previous bio-inspired models have concentrated on invertebrates, such as ants, mammals, such as primates with higher cognitive function, are valuable for modeling the increasingly complex problems in engineering. Understanding primates’ social and communication systems and applying what is learned from them to engineering domains will likely(More)
In this paper, we study a true coalition formation of three robots (i.e., 2 robots vs. 1 robot) in order to detect and capture intrusions in a curved loop. A coalition benefits robots by increasing detection and capture strength, but it has a tradeoff of paying an investment cost for each individual. We derive that a true coalition only arises when an(More)
In this paper, we proposed several primate-inspired communication mechanisms including delayed-and-relayed, scent-trail, and communications among robots. We analytically model and simulate the scent-trail communication. We assume that robots (mobile sensors or mobile actuators) are capable of deploying /throwing-out sensors/RFID tags.
In this paper, we are interested in a single robot detecting intrusions in a rectangular perimeter. We built a stochastic model analyzing the detection quality achieved by the single moving robot moving along the rectangular perimeter, based on the velocity, mobility pattern. We define the mode of intrusion events as follows: intrusions arrive at random(More)
Although previous bio-inspired models have concentrated on invertebrates (such as ants), mammals such as primates with higher cognitive function are valuable for modeling the increasingly complex problems in engineering. Understanding primates' social and communication systems, and applying what is learned from them to engineering domains is likely to(More)