William W. Agace

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Chemokine receptor CX3CR1(+) dendritic cells (DCs) have been suggested to sample intestinal antigens by extending transepithelial dendrites into the gut lumen. Other studies identified CD103(+) DCs in the mucosa, which, through their ability to synthesize retinoic acid (RA), appear to be capable of generating typical signatures of intestinal adaptive immune(More)
Macrophages (mφ) are essential for intestinal homeostasis and the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is unclear whether discrete mφ populations carry out these distinct functions or if resident mφ change during inflammation. We show here that most resident mφ in resting mouse colon express very high levels of CX3CR1, are avidly phagocytic(More)
A functionally distinct subset of CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) has recently been identified in murine mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) that induces enhanced FoxP3(+) T cell differentiation, retinoic acid receptor signaling, and gut-homing receptor (CCR9 and alpha4beta7) expression in responding T cells. We show that this function is specific to small(More)
The integrin CD103 is highly expressed at mucosal sites, but its role in mucosal immune regulation remains poorly understood. We have analyzed the functional role of CD103 in intestinal immune regulation using the T cell transfer model of colitis. Our results show no mandatory role for CD103 expression on T cells for either the development or CD4+CD25+(More)
Gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) dendritic cells (DCs) display a unique ability to generate CCR9+alpha4beta7+ gut-tropic CD8+ effector T cells. We demonstrate efficient induction of CCR9 and alpha4beta7 on CD8+ T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) after oral but not intraperitoneal (i.p.) antigen administration indicating differential targeting of(More)
CD103(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DCs) represent the major migratory DC population within the small intestinal lamina propria (SI-LP), but their in vivo function remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that intestinal CD103(+)CD11b(+) DC survival was dependent on interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). Mice with a DC deletion in Irf4 displayed reduced numbers(More)
TECK (thymus-expressed chemokine), a recently described CC chemokine expressed in thymus and small intestine, was found to mediate chemotaxis of human G protein-coupled receptor GPR-9-6/L1.2 transfectants. This activity was blocked by anti-GPR-9-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3C3. GPR-9-6 is expressed on a subset of memory alpha4beta7(high) intestinal(More)
Type 1 fimbriae are adhesion organelles expressed by many Gram-negative bacteria. They facilitate adherence to mucosal surfaces and inflammatory cells in vitro, but their contribution to virulence has not been defined. This study presents evidence that type 1 fimbriae increase the virulence of Escherichia coli for the urinary tract by promoting bacterial(More)
The intestine represents the largest compartment of the immune system. It is continually exposed to antigens and immunomodulatory agents from the diet and the commensal microbiota, and it is the port of entry for many clinically important pathogens. Intestinal immune processes are also increasingly implicated in controlling disease development elsewhere in(More)
HIV particles that use the chemokine receptor CXCR4 as a coreceptor for entry into cells (X4-HIV) inefficiently transmit infection across mucosal surfaces [1], despite their presence in seminal fluid and mucosal secretions from infected individuals [2] [3] [4]. In addition, although intestinal lymphocytes are susceptible to infection with either X4-HIV(More)